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WINTER HOURS (Nov - Mar) 9:30 - 5:30
SUMMER HOURS (Apr - Oct) 9:30 - 6:00

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

WINTER HOURS (Nov - Mar) 9:30 - 5:30
SUMMER HOURS (Apr - Oct) 9:30 - 6:00

WHO WE ARE

We specialize in the reclamation of historic building materials. Give us a call if you have an upcoming building or demolition project. We are your architectural salvage & used building materials resource center!

How We DIY: Beachwood Display Walls

This hot weather has been leaving the EWCrew in Seattle needing a little time on a beach. We’ve also been itching to build a project since we have such great weather. All of this is perfect given Earthwise’s newest reclaimed wood product: beachwood.  If you haven’t been in the stores lately, you may have missed this product’s arrival but have no fear – there’s lots to go around!

Tacoma EWSalvage Beachwood in stock
So, what is this “beachwood,” I’m talking about? The EWBeachwood is vintage scaffolding from sunny California that has been lime washed to give it a beautiful, white, cream, and gray coloring to it. But if you look at it from the side you see it has a secret… It has the most beautiful teal, blue, and purple stripes on the side.  The colored edges tell a story! Part of this material’s history goes that this scaffolding was used by a painting company with multiple teams. To differentiate one teams tools from the the others, each complete scaffolding system had a color assignment to match that team. This way the painting teams would know whose scaffolding was whose (personally I would have wanted to be on the purple team but all colors are great).
This material is 1-3/4″ thick by 9-1/2″ wide and pretty much as long as you want it so its great for benches, tables, shelves (since it has the great colored side detail), headboards – you name it! It is also available in a 5/8″ milled version, perfect for maximizing the square footage each piece can cover – plus this materials is reversible! This is great for texture walls, furring out a beam, using as veneer, or as a back splash.
Since this material has come in, all the staff has been drooling over it and creatively thinking about what WE could use it for. We finally got a chance to do a weekend project and play with this great material when the Seattle EWCrew built a new texture wall for the front display! We wanted to showcase all of our favorite aspects of it: the lime-washed fronts, the vibrant colored sides, and the cool, almost spalted looking reverse of the milled boards. The question was HOW does one showcase all the great aspects of it in one easy to see application?
A texture wall of course! The bottom of the wall is straight 8′ pieces which run vertically (perfect if you wanted to add interest to a wall or room).  At 36″ from the ground, we added a chair rail made from the colored strips and other strips of the inside which show that the material is actually of ply-like construction. Everybody had to pick their favorite piece, of course, so the colors are in varying thicknesses and lengths, which only adds to the variety, diverse colors and interest this material has to offer. Last but not least, we installed staggered pieces displaying both the front and back of this material above the chair rail. Since the scaffolding is not a solid beam, but many layers glued together to create a very heavy, very sturdy piece of lumber the crosscut shows all the details of the wood.
Reclaimed Beachwood Chair Rail Detail
We also played around with sanding the wood as that is a question we need to have the answers for! Sanding the wood too much removes the lime-washed gray finish but since you still need a smooth surface (especially if it will be in a high traffic area), we suggest using a steel or wire brush to remove the loose debris and then sealing it with a flat varnish preserving the finish and character of this unique materials but also saving you from splinters! <–No one wants those!
Tacoma EWSalvage Beachwood Dispaly Wall
The bottom line? Its great that we have so much of the material because it can be used for almost anything AND gets the EWCrew stamp-of-approval. And, as always if you share your beachwood project photos (or any project photo for that matter) we will send you a 15% coupon! Come in and get inspired. What will you use it for?
Seattle EWSalvage Beachwood Dispaly Wall

Your Dream Design Project is Here Somewhere: EWSalvage Reclaimed Finishes & Materials Line

EWSalvage Reclaimed Beachwood at the Seattle Showroom.

 

How do you add more character…to that accent wall or other project you’ve been planning for this year?! We’ve always got a few ideas…but what do you think of using the newest member to the custom materials line: Beach Wood (see photo above) from Earthwise? A new addition to the #EWSalvage family is now available for custom order! We are calling this reclaimed lumber ‘beach wood’ and it is remilled at our Tacoma location.

The unique history of this material resulted in the blues, teals and grays that evoke that beachy vibe. It was originally used as scaffolding for a painting company! The reverse (below, right) of the material is also pretty cool, we can’t decide which we like more! Help us decide by casting your vote over at the FB page – bonus: tell us how you’d use this new material.

EWBeachwoodSideTealBlue        EWBeachwoodBackFresh

Come into the showrooms to see samples, get more information & place orders – mention this blog post and save 5% immediately**! You can also email us with your questions and ideas!

**Are you a designer, architect, business or property owner interested in this reclaimed material or other options? Let us know – we will even come to YOU or your business and have trade discount opportunities we would love to offer you – contact or speak with Kadence at marketing “at” ewsalvage.com for more information.

EWBeachwoodFrontReclaim

How #YEW Saved the Seattle Holiday Tree!

Reclaimed Wood Tree lit at EWSalvage Seattle

The Christmas Tree is an iconic symbol of the season. Many will set up their PERFECT tree after Thanksgiving and will enjoy it through the end of the year…or maybe even until Valentine’s Day like one of our own did last year (we know your secrets, Kadence!).  At Earthwise, we, too, have been enjoying the splendor of a giant 10’ Christmas tree in classic Earthwise-style. It all began when the store manager, Lacy, was drooling over a catalog and saw a reclaimed,  slatted wood Christmas tree.  She thought to herself, “EW could make one of those…probably cooler!” So, she cut out the image and brought it into work and left it on a desk for all to see. The idea went over very well and construction was soon underway the Saturday after Thanksgiving.

Tree Branches EWSalvage Holiday Tree in Seattle

First things first, Matt had to calculate how many cedar T&G slats would be needed for the 10’ tree (anything less would be too small for the warehouse in Seattle with its 20′ ceiling). He did this by taking the 10’ tree minus 2’ (1’ for the base and 1’ for the star) and dividing the leftover by the thickness of the t &g.  We needed 160 slats. Then we figured the 160 slats needed to gradually go from biggest at the base (3’ long) to the smallest at the top (4”). Then he cut them smaller and smaller until we had enough to build the tree.

Next we drilled out a 1 inch hole in each “branch” for the steel pipe “trunk” to fit through. We decided on a 1 inch galvanized steel pipe because all the weight of the tree needed to be supported by something strong.  Nobody wants to be crushed by a 10’ tall salvaged Christmas tree!

At this point all is going well. The tree was going to be up by the end of the weekend and life would be good…or so we thought. As we quickly learned, when measuring pipe it’s an inside diameter NOT the outside diameter, meaning the 1” pipe bought for the tree was actually a 1.25” pipe and our holes in our branches are now too small to fit on the trunk for the tree. We tried drilling the hole in the branches larger but it broke the branches or left many of them chewed up. So, we were stuck and frustrated.

At Earthwise, we often lend sympathetic ears for customers when their projects go awry so it was a fun switch when our customers jumped in and helped. When a customer told us we would have to use a file and grind the holes larger by hand we wanted to cry. But before we knew it a few customers jumped in and did a few and the staff all did several and by the end of the next weekend the holes were finally large enough. A whole #YEW community project – if you contributed that day – the crew wants to say thanks!! We slid them onto the trunk and it was finished…except for standing it up. Once again the weekend crew was stumped, but not to fear! We quickly figured out how to stabilize the base and keep the tree up with the help of a pallet jack. The addition of a salvaged bedspring star made it complete! We decorated it and finished the front display and we were ready for the Holidays!

EWSalvage Crew decking the EWSalvage Seattle Holiday Tree

EWSalvage Holiday Tree Complete and Bare

But why stop there? Once the front display was finished, the door display above the counter looked bare! Nothing some green spray paint, a few 2x4s and 1x4s, festively colored cabinet hardware couldn’t fix: we made wreaths for the doors (see photo below)! And, since we have new staff members in the Seattle store who wanted to play with the Holiday Tree and Snowman DIY Kits we have a forest of festivities around the store! We have enjoyed the decorating, no matter how challenging. And, getting to see all of our customers enjoy the store at the holidays has made all of our hard work pay off.

Thank you for celebrating with Earthwise and hope all of you have very Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

EWWreaths

Bedspring Star on EWSalvage Seattle Holiday Tree

This post was written by Lacy Kabrich, Seattle EWSalvage Store Manager.

Salvage Word Wednesdays: Board Foot

Salvage Word Wednesdays began as an answer to a customer’s curiosity – see the first post here! In these posts, expect to find a jargon or EWSlang term and its definition with an example (or two!) of how we use it, to the best of our abilities/knowledge. See the whole series here! If you have questions or want to submit a word, please send us your ideas via email at marketing@ewsalvage.com.

Week 2: BOARD FOOT

Salvage Wood: Board Foot

EWSalvage Example: “Reclaimed lumber is sold by the board foot.”

This term is a relatively young term to ‘Americanism’ and building trades jargon, emerging in the 1890s-1900s – not surprisingly, right around the time our beloved Washington Territory was also being explored by the hordes of lumbermen, carpenters, builders, and other skilled artisans that would build the foundations of what would one day become the second largest timber-producing State in the Nation – thanks for that fact NatGeo! As American History USA puts it, “It is difficult to imagine the development of Seattle and the rest of Washington without the presence of the logging industry.” Now, after that foray into history, back to business.

Definition: board foota unit of measure equal to the cubic contents of a piece of lumber one foot square and one inch thick, used in measuring logs and lumber. (abbrev. bf.ft.; BF).

At EWSalvage, you’ve probably heard a staff member relay that we sell our reclaimed, remilled vintage lumber by the BOARD FOOT. However, not all the lumber we acquire and sell comes in a perfect cube! So, in laymen’s terms, a board foot is a volumetric, proportional measurement which relates any piece of lumber to a hypothetical section which measures 12″x12″x1″ to determine board footage and ultimately, the selling price! Whew…that was a mouthful!

This post is becoming a bit more like Salvage Word & Math Lesson Wednesday: let’s say you came to the salvage yard and are making a fireplace mantel. You found a piece of fir at Earthwise that is just right: 3″ x 8-1/2″ x 78″. To determine the board footage of a beam, use this equation:

BF =   (L” x W” x D”) / 144″

So, that means your mantel stock piece has 13.8125 BF in volume. Simply multiply that by the $4.50/BF price to get the cost: $62.16+tax! Nice find.

EWSalvage typically sells reclaimed lumber brimming with character, nail stains, check marks, and sometimes, even those highly coveted sawblade marks for $1.95 – 3.95/BF; remilled, rough sawn lumber sells for $4.50+/BF (additional charges may apply for surfacing requests, rarer oversized stock or timber species, rush services, delivery, etc). 1″- 2-1/2″ stock is available at both locations in 6″-11″ widths x 6′-12′ lengths; we also stock chunkier dimensional material of all sorts for any project size – call or visit for current stock. Large quantity required or we don’t have what you’re looking for right now? We also offer custom milling services through the vintage sawmill at our Tacoma location – just call or email us at either location for details, lead time, minimum order size, etc!

From furniture makers, business and home owners, to DIY mantel or heirloom table project makers, salvage lovers like you have used this material in a myriad of creative ways – find TONS of examples on our #EWFamous Inspiration Page! Because we just don’t let trees get 100’s of years old anymore, this is a non-renewable resource and a great way to add character, history and provenance to your projects. This material is a showstopper and will make any project command at least a second glance!

Make sure to let us know how YOU have used reclaimed and/or remilled lumber from Earthwise, or can imagine them being used. Email us at either location or at marketing@ewsalvage.com with your salvage word suggestions!

Reclaimed Lumber Sign at EarthwiseReclaimed fir lumber at Earthwise Seattle.Dining room table made by Tim W from doug fir remilled and reclaimed by Earthwise Salvage in Tacoma.

 

 

 

Salvage Word Wednesdays: Wood Jackets

Salvage Word Wednesdays began as an answer to a customer’s curiosity regarding a term we used to describe a design detail in an Earthwise newsletter in October 2014. It was her idea that we explain (more in depth) certain phrases, words, and terms used in the salvage and construction industries on a regular basis with which the layman may not be familiar. In these posts, expect to find a jargon or EWSlang term and its definition and an example (or two!) of how we use it, to the best of our abilities. See the whole series here! If you have questions or want to submit a word, please send us your ideas via email at marketing@ewsalvage.com.

Week 1: WOOD JACKETS

EWSalvage Example: “Mike reused wood jackets as wall paneling in his entry way.”

This term is used in reference to the thin layer of greyish to chocolatey-brown oxidation that is 1/32″-1/16″ in thickness on the  outermost layer of reclaimed beams, which is usually milled off to square the material for the sawing process. This is where you see the majority of the character markings, saw blade marks, nail stains, chipping paints and patina on a piece of lumber. This material is non-uniform in dimension and not considered useable by the lumber industry – just waste to them, can you believe that?!

The resulting material which EWSalvage sells for .50 – 1.75/LF is between 1/8″-1/2″ thin and varies in lengths and widths. There are 2 finish sides: one with the patina and one without oxidation. Many clients have used this to clad walls, adding more warmth and visual interest than traditional tongue-in-groove wall paneling. It can also be used with blocking to recreate the look of exposed beams. Many love them for creative projects, as their non-uniformity lends them to easier use than full sized lumber cuts: think signage, furniture treatments, picture frames, shelving, and more.

Make sure to let us know how YOU have used wood jackets, or imagine them being used. And if you do make jackets out of wood, we would love hear about that, too! Email us at either location or at marketing@ewsalvage.com with your salvage word suggestions!

Wood Jackets Explained by EWSalvageWood jacket material visible in natural form on fir beam. Wood jacket layer visible in gray, bleached or painted form on fir beam